Gunwales and bottom sanding

Wow, I’ve been doing a terrible job of keeping track of hours with the last several posts missing. Removing stitches and epoxying the gunwales together was probably only an hour total. Several days ago I dry fitted the gunwales to the boat and clamped them in place. Today school was cancelled for the kids due to icy conditions – a great day to stay home from work and get some boat work accomplished. It’s been a very damp 32F out in the carport. Standing on the cold concrete was not a lot of fun. In bits and pieces today I got the two gunwales glued with Titebond 3, clamped and screwed in place with 3/4″ #6 stainless steel screws. Should have used those when attaching the sides to the bulkhead and transom too. Much easier than trying to bang bronze ring-shank nails into a wobbly target. Then I flipped the boat and started sanding down all the edges to get ready for fiberglassing. I used a new 5″ disc sander drill bit attachment. I loaded it into my big old-fashioned wall power drill and went to town. A sheet of 40 grit paper tore right through those big epoxy slugs. I’m very pleased with the way that works. Much more aggressive than random orbital sander. It’s nice to have options. It also became very clear that I should have spent more time trying to get the boat to fit better together at the wiring stage, which probably means I should have spent more time back in the drawing and cutting phases. I certainly can understand the appeal of a nice CLC kit. Looking at the bow of the boat, it’s clear that it’s about an inch off the center line to port. It will be interesting to see how much of an effect that has on the water. Hopefully it won’t be that noticeable. Maybe boat number two will come in a bit more square. There are a few gaps and low spots that could stand some epoxy work before glassing the bottom, but time is running short. We have Monday off for MLK and the weather is supposed to be 50F. It would be great to do the fiberglassing that day. I’ll have to see if I can manage to fill all the spots before then.

Gunwales dry fitted in place

Gunwales dry fitted in place

Gunwales glued and screwed in place

Gunwales glued and screwed in place

A few wobbly lines sighting down the sanded edges

A few wobbly lines sighting down the sanded edges

Transom sanded

Transom sanded

A few more highs and lows along that side-bilge joint

A few more highs and lows along that side-bilge joint

The nose leaning an inch to port

The nose leaning an inch to port

Total hours including last few posts: 4/30

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