finishing yard and boom

I still haven’t glued up the 8 piece mast yet. There’s been a lot of crazy happening both in work and personal life. Today I wanted to get some boat work accomplished so I decided it was time to fiberglass tape the ends of the yard and boom. I’m using the Duckworks DWX epoxy to coat the glass and since it has built in UV resistance you can use it as a finish, so I just painted it on both spars. It has a long pot life, so I mixed up 3 pumps each. I didn’t have quite enough to do all 4 sides, but I coated 3 sides each. It started to get a little gummy toward the end and I’m worried about drips and runs. I’ve gone back over it once to remove drips. I’ll check back in a while to see if there are more. At least there’s a little progress.

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8 piece mast

Finally made some progress on the mast this weekend. I got the 8 strips cut down to size and notched the 45 degree angle into on side of them using the radial saw. The next trick was to taper them from 19/16ths down to 15/16ths over a 10′ span. I set the pieces up on some of the left over 2×12 on saw horses.

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I marked out the first one and carefully cut down to the line with a block plane and a number 4 plane that I just got from my friend Shawn. It belonged to his grandfather and I’m honored to have it in my shop making boats. With the first one cut as a template I thought I’d get out the router with the flush cut bit and trim the next one to match the template. That didn’t go so well. Lots of noise, dust and a big gouge later:

router gouge

router gouge

For the next one I just used the No 4 plane, set the blade a bit deeper and knocked it out in no time. Should have just done that from the beginning. It’s so much nicer working with a plane than power tools. It came out just fine.

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With a break in the middle for lunch and a swim with the in-laws, I got all 8 of them cut out and ready to assemble. I’m hoping to get the yard and boom epoxy coated this week and then get the mast assembled this weekend. I’ve decided to build the GIS with the mizzen mast, so that means one more spar to build before I get moving on this hull.

 

Grizzly

Just upgraded the bandsaw in the shop to a 14″ Grizzly. It’s definitely the best tool in the shop now. Tonight I used it cut out the boom. Both the yard and boom are rough cut now with some clean up work done. Need to finish cleaning them up with the block plane, round the corners, sand them down, drill some holes, fiberglass tape the ends and varnish them. Sheesh. Feels like I’ve made no progress at all… ­čśë

Putting the yard through the bandsaw

I recently inherited some tools from my father-in-law when they sold their house and downsized. One of those things was a bandsaw. I had never really used one much before today. The yard and the boom for the Goat Island Skiff taper from 40mm down to 28mm at one end. Originally I imagined I would shape them by hand the way I did for the PD Racer, but even with the nice Lie-Nielsen block plane there was just too much wood to remove. I decided to try running it through the bandsaw and it was fabulous. I made 3 passes through to taper the wood in 2 dimensions. Next I need to figure out how to get down to my lines and make it nice and smooth. Maybe now the block plane with do the trick. Tomorrow I’ll see if I can get the boom done.┬áThen I’ll round over the corners, fiberglass tape the ends and give both┬áspars a few light coats of the new DWX epoxy.

 

rough shaping spars through the bandsaw

rough shaping spars through the bandsaw

Almost another launch day

We are getting very close to another boat launch day. I probably could have launched it already, but at this point there is no rush. We have a camping trip coming up in a few weeks where we’ll spend 5 days on Kerr Lake. That will be the perfect launch day and give the paint plenty of time to cure.

shiny paint

shiny paint

In order to get ready for that trip, it’s time to add another coat of varnish to the spars and the other set of Klepper paddles.

fresh varnish

Klepper paddles get a coat of varnish

Klepper paddles get a coat of varnish

I also drilled a couple of holes in the deck hatch and filled them with epoxy. I’ll drill smaller holes through the epoxy to make a waterproof bearing. I’ll tie a small rope through the holes to make a handle for pulling up the hatch and add a bungee line clipped to a ring attached to the bottom of the air box.

epoxy plugs

epoxy plugs

Time to get cranking on the Goat Island Skiff project!

Painting and a broken boom

We’re into the final stages of Molly’s Toto. The paint has been acquired and 2 coats of primer are done. The rear flotation box has it’s first coat of bright white paint. Once the second coat goes on today we can screw the deck down with a bead of silicone and finish sanding the rear deck to size.

helpers

helpers

two coats of primer finished

two coats of primer finished

On Friday, Matt and I went out sailing. I brought the Terror of the Sea out for the first time this season. The weather called for winds to 20 mph. Generally I find the wind reports around here seem to be optimistic and when I get out on the lake you’re lucky if they hit what the weather called for. Friday this was not the case. We launched from Rolling View on Falls Lake┬áaround noon and the wind was already blowing strongly. We sailed out into the lake and I realized that I probably had too much sail up for the conditions. There were some pretty good waves rolling on the lake. I dropped the sail into the new lazy jacks while I started to tie in a reef. Even with no sail up we were pushed more than half way across the lake toward Sandling Beach. With the reef finally tied in I tried to hoist the sail again. The wind caught the sail and whipped it around so hard that the thin white pine boom cracked in half at a knot. I quickly dropped sail and started rowing back toward the far shore. Matt came sailing up and his Melonseed seemed to be handling the conditions much better than the little PDR. He thought he could tow me in so we threw a rope across. Then they had trouble getting their sail up and I figured they’d be better off without me. I cut the rope loose and started pulling at the oars again. Matt and Amy started drifting off toward Sandling as I dropped the mast and eventually removed the dragon head from the front of the boat to try to cut down as much wind resistance as possible. After an hour and half of hard rowing I finally made it back. At times the wind blew so hard I had to row at my best to keep the boat from blowing backwards. Once I got the boat loaded up I couldn’t see Matt across the lake. I drove over to Sandling and found them trying to pull the boat into a lee where they could get the sail up and get a good tack angle. It turns out that the fork on the gaff yard had broken on one side so Matt could no longer raise the sail very high. Under heavily reefed sail they set out again and I watched them tack past the old peer.

Heavily reefed Melonseed

Heavily reefed Melonseed

I walked back to the car and drove back to the point. They were out of sight, so I headed back across the lake to try to catch sight of them again. I made it back to Rolling View and saw them still fighting to make headway near the opposite shore. A man and his son were just launching a bass boat, so I enlisted their help in getting a tow. By now it was 5 pm. I watched long enough to see Matt drop the sail and get tied up to the boat and I headed for home.

Time to laminate a slightly larger boom from multiple pieces of wood to make a stronger piece.

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Thankfully the new oarlocks worked well. If those had given way, I would never have made it back across the lake.

I looked up the wind conditions for the airport for the time we were on the lake. It was steady 18-20mph with gusts to 30 mph. Maybe too much wind for the Puddle Duck.